Archive for August 2017

When It Comes to Healthcare Violence, Silence Isn’t an Option

Editor’s note: As the topic of violence in healthcare has become a hot topic, The Hospital Leader is offering perspectives from two of our expert bloggers. This piece is the second of two; to view the first blog post from Tracy Cardin, click here.  Our health system recently started reporting the number of workplace violence occurrences on our daily safety call. Before now, most of us had no idea how incredibly common these events were within our walls! It reminded me of an event I experienced a few years ago, while rounding on a young male patient who had significant issues with chronic pain and opioid abuse. While discussing his pain regimen in his room one day on rounds, he became extremely agitated with physically aggressive mannerisms. I quickly realized that not only was I alone in the room, but he was between me and the door. Thankfully, a nurse in the…

How Do We Keep Our Providers Safe?

Editor's note: As the topic of violence in healthcare has become a hot topic, The Hospital Leader is offering perspectives from two of our expert bloggers. This piece authored by Tracy Cardin is the first of two. The second from Danielle Scheurer will publish next Thursday, August 31. In the last three weeks while on clinical service, the police had to be called twice for incidents involving my patients. One involved a patient threatening me and a nurse with physical violence outside of the hospital, and the second included a patient hitting a nurse in the face. She was saved from more serious injury, simply because she fell backwards just as the punch landed. This was just in my panel of patients. Lest you think maybe I need some training on interacting with patients, another patient threw a full cup of coffee, then the cup, at an attending physician. Another patient had…

We Have a Voice. It’s Time We Use It. #DoctorsSpeakOut

Recently, there have been many times when you may have gotten a news alert on your phone or checked the latest Twitter hashtag and wanted to scream. Or you were too busy to even check until later that day and did not know what to say other than to lurk and watch a trainwreck in progress. You may have thought about saying something, but paused and wondered, “Is this professional? What will this say about me as a doctor? What would my colleagues/supervisors think? What would my patients think?” You are not alone. I get stopped, emailed, and messaged frequently by others wondering if they should enter the fray. Something interesting happened with the recent Repeal and Replace or Repeal and Delay or Repeal and whatever roller coaster: Doctors did speak up! One group that was truly impressive was the pediatricians on Twitter, known as “tweetiatricians” who all recorded short…

Hospital Medicine Moves, JHM Research & Choosing Wisely Make HM News

­SHM & Hospital Medicine in the News: August 3 – August 17, 2017 Check out the latest hospital medicine and SHM-related stories in mainstream and healthcare news. For the full stories, click on the links below: Patrick Conway, MD, MSc, MHM announced that he will be leaving his position as chief medical officer at CMS to join Blue Cross Blue Shield North Carolina as President and CEO. Vineet Arora, MD, MPP, MHM was quoted in Becker’s Hospital Review providing insight on why female physicians may be less engaged with their work. Journal of Hospital Medicine research on breakdowns in care was highlighted in an article on The Clinical Advisor. Another Journal of Hospital Medicine article on communication methods in the hospital was cited in an article on HealthIT Security. SHM’s efforts in the Choosing Wisely campaign with the ABIM were cited in a recent article on Medscape. SHM Senior Marketing…

Is It Time for Health Policy M&Ms?

[caption id="attachment_16917" align="alignnone" width="609"] https://twitter.com/ChrisMoriates/status/890259986873450508[/caption] There are few experiences in my medical training that felt more intimidating, and ultimately more impactful, than our Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) conferences. The patients whose diagnoses I missed. The times I should have called my attending or pushed harder for the cardiologist to come in overnight. They stick with me and I believe ultimately have helped make me a better doctor. This is why I was intrigued by the idea of explicitly incorporating health policy issues into M&M. Over the past few years, I increasingly have seen adverse events that result from issues related to health policy. Inability to access care for appropriate hospital follow-up. Failure to fill a critical prescription due to cost or gaps in coverage. A patient I admitted for “expedited work-up” for rectal bleeding after he told me he had been trying to get a recommended colonoscopy for many months…
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