Posts by Guest Post

It Takes a Village – Part I: What I learned from my in-laws’ Thanksgiving dinner

by Dr. Ryan Brown MD, FACP It seems like it was just yesterday that I first walked into Thanksgiving dinner at my in-laws’ and remembered thinking to myself, “What did I get myself into?” Coming from a very small family, I had never been exposed to the chaos that comes from letting 70 people loose in an elementary school cafeteria for dinner. Overwhelming, yes! But amazingly, when the food was ready, the chaos subsided and by the end of the night everyone was fed, happy, and ready to do it again! Even more amazing was the look of satisfaction on the organizers’ faces as they saw the happiness they created. Two decades later, I had that same feeling when I envisioned how 200 providers from 19 different facilities, separated by 400 miles and 2 different EMRs could all move in the same direction to achieve key quality initiatives. But then…

Women, Leadership & Hospital Medicine: Lean In

by Dr. Rachel George MD, MBA, CPE, SFHM It is time for women in hospital medicine to sit at the table, pursue our ambitions, and change the conversation to what we can do to transform patient care. One year ago Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, published her best-selling novel Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead encouraging women to do just that. So, what’s the buzz about? Wasn’t this all sorted out a generation ago and didn’t we get this equal rights thing figured out? We can have it all, right? Unfortunately, that may not be the case. The United States is far behind other countries in helping women stay in the work force; America comes in last place on paid maternity leave (CNN Money), and according to a survey released by the United Nation’s labor agency, only three countries do not provide cash benefits to women during…

Safety Matters – Especially to Our Patients

by Paul W. Abramowitz, PharmD, ScD, FASHP The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) is dedicated to building relationships within the health care community that strengthen medication and patient safety through interprofessional care. We are excited to have the Society of Hospital Medicine’s (SHM) participation this year in our Medication Safety Collaborative. As health care practitioners, our number one goal is to deliver quality care to patients throughout the entire health care continuum. ASHP’s Medication Safety Collaborative helps to achieve this goal. The collaboration between hospitalists and pharmacists is very important. As medication therapy experts, pharmacists—when working collaboratively with physicians, nurses and other health care practitioners—help to foster optimal models for team-based, patient-centered care. The Medication Safety Collaborative (Collaborative) promotes this by offering a unique interprofessional, educational opportunity to bring together practitioners to build and exchange ideas on improving quality and patient care. The feedback we received about last year’s Collaborative…

Broken RAC System Continues to Hurt Patients, Providers

by Dr. Bart Caponi MD, FHM “Inpatient” and “Observation” are terms familiar to every hospitalist, and to increasing numbers of patients and lawmakers.  The difference can be significant--while “inpatients” are covered by Medicare Part A, people in “observation” are not; nor do they gain access to other benefits, like nursing home rehabilitation.  Until recently, no one paid any attention to status, but now patients and doctors are oppressed by it.  Why? Recovery Audit Contractors (RACs). (more…)

An emergency call to food! There’s a MALNUTRITION GAP IN HOSPITALS

by Dr. Karim Godamunne MD, MBA, SFHM Every day we admit patients to the hospital and on day one we order a diet or maybe we don’t and we wait, and wait and occasionally wait some more.  Or maybe we just don’t order enough (nutrition that is).  Evidence from the Journal of Parental and Enteral Nutrition suggests that in 2010 only 3.2% of hospitalized patients got a diagnosis of malnutrition - remarkably this is over 2 times better than in 2000 when less than 1.5% of patients were coded with a diagnosis of malnutrition. Recent literature has also reported that between 21% and 54% of hospitalized patients have malnutrition and thus there appears to be a significant “malnutrition gap.” With 1 in 3 hospitalized patients demonstrating malnutrition characteristics but only 1 in 30 have a documented diagnosis of malnutrition – a 10 fold “malnutrition gap” exists. There are several evidence…
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