Posts by Guest Post

Taking the First Steps to Becoming a QI Change Agent

by Aram Namavar, MS
Editor’s Note: Throughout the upcoming weeks, The Hospital Leader will feature posts from SHM’s 2016 Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant recipients describing the QI projects they conducted as a part of their grants. Applications for the 2017 grant are now open at www.futureofhospitalmedicine.org/grant and will close on January 11, 2017.  This is the third in the series from medical student Aram Namavar, MS. I can’t pinpoint the exact time that I was introduced to quality improvement. Was it when I set foot in Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center for the first time as a student volunteer? Or was it during my adolescence when I would witness family members being readmitted too many times to count due to language and cultural disparities, or medication non-compliance? All I know is that my past experiences have propelled me towards a path of being a quality improvement change agent, and I hope to inspire others along the way. Since I…
Aram A. Namavar, MS, is a second year medical student at the Loyola University Chicago – Stritch School of Medicine. Aram has been involved in Quality since 2011 when working in patient experience and then to reduce hospital readmissions at UCLA Health. In 2014, Aram founded The Healthcare Improvement & iNnovation in Quality (THINQ) Collaborative within the Department of Medicine at UCLA Health. Inspired by his experiences, he co-founded the first Hospital Medicine Interest Group at a medical school in 2015 and then was elected to serve at the national level on SHM's Physicians in Training Committee.

Student Scholar Makes the Rounds to Improve Discharge Process

by Joseph Moo-Young
Editor’s Note: Throughout the upcoming weeks, The Hospital Leader will feature posts from SHM’s 2016 Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant recipients describing the QI projects they conducted as a part of their grants. Applications for the 2017 grant are now open at www.futureofhospitalmedicine.org/grant and will close on January 11, 2017.  This is the second in the series from medical student Joseph Moo-Young. Before entering the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine, I learned about quality through the lens of an engineering student. The engineering curriculum included a course in Lean Six Sigma methodologies, and the problems we solved focused on industrial processes, from injection molding to yarn manufacturing. When I discovered that hospitals used similar methodologies to improve clinical operations, I realized the wealth of opportunities available to apply quality improvement (QI) principles and methodologies to healthcare processes. My clinical skills instructor at UNC, Dr. Kathy Bradford, happened to be one of the major…
Joseph Moo Young is a second-year medical student at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine. Prior to entering medical school, he studied chemical engineering and textile engineering at NC State University.

Starting the Conversation toward a Better Patient Experience

by Haverly Snyder
Editor's Note: Throughout the upcoming weeks, The Hospital Leader will feature posts from SHM's 2016 Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant recipients describing the QI projects they conducted as a part of their grants. Applications for the 2017 grant open on September 14, 2016 at www.futureofhospitalmedicine.org/grant.  This is the first in the series from medical student Haverly Snyder. As a student, it can be difficult to feel as if you are making a difference. With the long hours spent studying, I find myself seeking out opportunities to engage with the medical community and affect change in hospital medicine. For me, quality improvement (QI) work achieves those goals by allowing me to see real change at the patient level. I first became interested in QI during my undergraduate experience at Saint Louis University where I majored in Health Sciences. I was required to take a QI class my senior year and was unsure of how I…
Haverly Snyder is a second-year medical student at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She studied Health Sciences and was inducted into Alpha Eta, the Allied Health Honor Society, at Saint Louis University, where she received her Bachelor of Science degree in 2015. Her research interests include: vulnerable populations in health, violence against women, resident work hours, hospital experience and interprofessional communication. In her free time, she enjoys playing soccer, playing violin, hiking and spending time with family and friends.

Hospitality and Art in Medicine: A Response to Sarah Candler, MD’s “Medical Map-Making”

by John David Ike
By: John David (JD) Ike As a medical student, much of my time and energy is spent studying the sciences. For the better part of my day, I pour through online resources, question banks and medical journals to learn the facts necessary to succeed on the wards and on the boards. Little to no time is spent discussing the broader implications of medicine on society, the tenets of medical professionalism, and the history of the medical profession. Most importantly, no time is spent discussing the arts – the tangible elements that display and celebrate our shared humanity and highlight our values, beliefs and traditions. As an appreciator of the arts with a research interest in the intersection of visual art and medicine, I found an opportunity to explore this topic as a teaching assistant for an Emory University undergraduate study abroad course in Italy titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts.”…
John David (JD) is a fourth-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, GA. Prior to attending medical school, JD earned his Bachelor of Arts in Art History at Davidson College in Davidson, NC. While at Davidson, JD explored many topics related to the art of medicine including the manifestation of the medical discourse in Thomas Eakins’ 19th century surgical paintings and the role government and urban design play in control of a populace’s well-being through an exploration of the 19th century “Haussmannization” of Paris, France. While at Emory, JD was able to continue his passion for the medical humanities as a teaching assistant for an undergraduate study abroad course titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts” and through other related endeavors. He plans to enter internal medicine upon graduation from Emory and hopes to continue to explore his research and teaching interest in the medical humanities. Please feel free to reach out to JD at [email protected]

Hospitalists & Unionization: Part II

by David Schwartz, MD
By: Dr. David Schwartz Senator Elizabeth Warren once said, “If you don’t have a seat at the table, you are probably on the menu.” While somewhat amusing on the surface, Warren’s comment cuts to the core of why my colleagues and I decided to form the first hospitalist specialty union. The Outsourcing: In 2014, a consulting firm was hired to review our hospitalist program. We were a 38-member group serving a 382 bed referral hospital - one of only two in our community of 200,000. We care for 50-60% of inpatients at any given time and average 35-40 admissions - and sometimes over 50 - in a 24-hour period. Our census had been growing significantly for some time without a comparable increase in staffing.  The occupancy rate of the hospital consistently reaches 90-100%.  The only other hospital is a 115 bed community medical center. We were told that the purpose…
Dr. Schwartz is the president of the Pacific Northwest Hospital Medicine Association, AFT local 6552, and is a hospitalist at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Springfield, Oregon. He graduated from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and completed residency in Internal Medicine at New York Medical College.
12345...1020...