Ethics (clinical and business)

Cultivating Women Leaders in Healthcare #WIMmonth #ThisIsWhatADoctorLooksLike

On my way home from Scotland, I had a moment to watch a movie while my daughter was caught up in the encore adventures of Moana. I stumbled upon Hidden Figures, the story of the African American women at NASA who helped launch John Glenn into space, relaunching the nation’s space program. These women were true heroes and patriots – they lived in a man’s world and a white world, and they still managed to overcome and lead when needed. Yet, their story was “hidden” from the public until years later when popularized into this screenplay. On the plane, I realized I needed a fresh take to start my women in medicine webinar for this month’s American Medical Association Women in Medicine webinar. Instead of exploring the ‘leaky pipeline’ resulting in 1 in 5 professors who are female, I wondered whether were there hidden figures – women leaders among us…

What We Expect and What We Get from Work

Are American workers becoming happier with less? An interesting article in last Friday’s Wall Street Journal reported on the findings of a recent survey of U.S. workers by the Conference Board, a research organization. Although the survey wasn’t specific to healthcare, much less hospitalists, I see some parallels that might cause many of us to stop and think more carefully about what we expect from our work. The Conference Board’s findings highlight how American workers’ employment relationships are evolving and how that is impacting what Americans think of as a “good” job. The biggest shift has come in the nature of the implied compact between workers and their employers; unlike a generation or two ago, U.S. workers no longer expect to receive a generous benefits and lifelong employment in exchange for hard work and loyalty. In fact, I suspect many younger workers today would face the prospect of lifelong employment…

When It Comes to Healthcare Violence, Silence Isn’t an Option

Editor’s note: As the topic of violence in healthcare has become a hot topic, The Hospital Leader is offering perspectives from two of our expert bloggers. This piece is the second of two; to view the first blog post from Tracy Cardin, click here.  Our health system recently started reporting the number of workplace violence occurrences on our daily safety call. Before now, most of us had no idea how incredibly common these events were within our walls! It reminded me of an event I experienced a few years ago, while rounding on a young male patient who had significant issues with chronic pain and opioid abuse. While discussing his pain regimen in his room one day on rounds, he became extremely agitated with physically aggressive mannerisms. I quickly realized that not only was I alone in the room, but he was between me and the door. Thankfully, a nurse in the…

We Have a Voice. It’s Time We Use It. #DoctorsSpeakOut

Recently, there have been many times when you may have gotten a news alert on your phone or checked the latest Twitter hashtag and wanted to scream. Or you were too busy to even check until later that day and did not know what to say other than to lurk and watch a trainwreck in progress. You may have thought about saying something, but paused and wondered, “Is this professional? What will this say about me as a doctor? What would my colleagues/supervisors think? What would my patients think?” You are not alone. I get stopped, emailed, and messaged frequently by others wondering if they should enter the fray. Something interesting happened with the recent Repeal and Replace or Repeal and Delay or Repeal and whatever roller coaster: Doctors did speak up! One group that was truly impressive was the pediatricians on Twitter, known as “tweetiatricians” who all recorded short…

How Often Do You Ask This (Ineffective) Question?

How often do we get complacent with knowledge?  We hear the same thing over and over, and the message becomes lore.  Drink eight ounces of water per day or turkey makes you drowsy—not only do we as docs believe it but we tell family members and patients the same. I came across a new study in CMAJ that fractures another piece of lore we hold fast. And not only should this study put the kibosh on it, but also upends a practice (a patient question) that teachers from eons past have instructed us to use over and over and over.  The question has intuitive appeal, is easy to gestalt, and has a universal understanding.  Non-physicians and laypeople can grasp what the answer implies without any difficulty.  (more…)
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