Students & Residents

Here you will find blog posts by medical students, residents and their advisors exploring a career in hospital medicine. To learn more about what SHM offers students and residents, visit: www.hospitalmedicine.org/students or www.hospitalmedicine.org/residents.

Wow! A Two-fer

First I hear the American Board of Pediatrics ordains hospital medicine as a bonafide subspecialty. Then, for the adults among us, CMS issues a hospitalist specialty code.  No joke.  A specialty code--go live on April 3, 2017. This has been a laborious task and years in the making. Have a lookie: If you are scratching your head and wondering about the fuss, let me tell you the insights we will draw from the new knowledge and why it will advance our specialty.  For years, hospitalists got lumped with "generalists" when CMS, researchers, or insurance companies ventured to look at physician utilization patterns and service to the healthcare system. What was our individual and collective cost or contribution to a case?  Who understood.  Any interested party trying to untangle what a doc was producing during a hospital stay had only billing patterns, i.e., the percentage of inpatient codes one charged, to determine if…

You May Have The Killer Med App. But My Hand Still Beats Yours.

Think about how many times per week you pull out your medical calculator to plug and play a Wells or CHADS-VASc score.  Twice?  Three times?  Now think about how many times you get pestered about readmissions--be it through case managers, hospital leaders, or through your paycheck.  Probably daily. You can use an app every day and think it's useful.  But it's the regs and invisible stuff that trumps what you got.  That's my "hand." I have written in the past about high impact readmission publications.  They may seem far removed from what you do in your everyday lives.  Maybe so.  But sometimes the audience for these articles are not frontline clinicians--even though their ability to transform your practice life may be more potent than what you would absorb and use from a familiar journal. Many of us have been carping for years about the post-discharge responsibility period for hospitals as…

Taking the First Steps to Becoming a QI Change Agent

by Aram Namavar, MS
Editor’s Note: Throughout the upcoming weeks, The Hospital Leader will feature posts from SHM’s 2016 Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant recipients describing the QI projects they conducted as a part of their grants. Applications for the 2017 grant are now open at www.futureofhospitalmedicine.org/grant and will close on January 11, 2017.  This is the third in the series from medical student Aram Namavar, MS. I can’t pinpoint the exact time that I was introduced to quality improvement. Was it when I set foot in Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center for the first time as a student volunteer? Or was it during my adolescence when I would witness family members being readmitted too many times to count due to language and cultural disparities, or medication non-compliance? All I know is that my past experiences have propelled me towards a path of being a quality improvement change agent, and I hope to inspire others along the way. Since I…
Aram A. Namavar, MS, is a second year medical student at the Loyola University Chicago – Stritch School of Medicine. Aram has been involved in Quality since 2011 when working in patient experience and then to reduce hospital readmissions at UCLA Health. In 2014, Aram founded The Healthcare Improvement & iNnovation in Quality (THINQ) Collaborative within the Department of Medicine at UCLA Health. Inspired by his experiences, he co-founded the first Hospital Medicine Interest Group at a medical school in 2015 and then was elected to serve at the national level on SHM's Physicians in Training Committee.

Student Scholar Makes the Rounds to Improve Discharge Process

by Joseph Moo-Young
Editor’s Note: Throughout the upcoming weeks, The Hospital Leader will feature posts from SHM’s 2016 Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant recipients describing the QI projects they conducted as a part of their grants. Applications for the 2017 grant are now open at www.futureofhospitalmedicine.org/grant and will close on January 11, 2017.  This is the second in the series from medical student Joseph Moo-Young. Before entering the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine, I learned about quality through the lens of an engineering student. The engineering curriculum included a course in Lean Six Sigma methodologies, and the problems we solved focused on industrial processes, from injection molding to yarn manufacturing. When I discovered that hospitals used similar methodologies to improve clinical operations, I realized the wealth of opportunities available to apply quality improvement (QI) principles and methodologies to healthcare processes. My clinical skills instructor at UNC, Dr. Kathy Bradford, happened to be one of the major…
Joseph Moo Young is a second-year medical student at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine. Prior to entering medical school, he studied chemical engineering and textile engineering at NC State University.

Starting the Conversation toward a Better Patient Experience

by Haverly Snyder
Editor's Note: Throughout the upcoming weeks, The Hospital Leader will feature posts from SHM's 2016 Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant recipients describing the QI projects they conducted as a part of their grants. Applications for the 2017 grant open on September 14, 2016 at www.futureofhospitalmedicine.org/grant.  This is the first in the series from medical student Haverly Snyder. As a student, it can be difficult to feel as if you are making a difference. With the long hours spent studying, I find myself seeking out opportunities to engage with the medical community and affect change in hospital medicine. For me, quality improvement (QI) work achieves those goals by allowing me to see real change at the patient level. I first became interested in QI during my undergraduate experience at Saint Louis University where I majored in Health Sciences. I was required to take a QI class my senior year and was unsure of how I…
Haverly Snyder is a second-year medical student at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She studied Health Sciences and was inducted into Alpha Eta, the Allied Health Honor Society, at Saint Louis University, where she received her Bachelor of Science degree in 2015. Her research interests include: vulnerable populations in health, violence against women, resident work hours, hospital experience and interprofessional communication. In her free time, she enjoys playing soccer, playing violin, hiking and spending time with family and friends.
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