HM15 – Annual Meeting

Join Us for Clinical Reasoning at HM15

by Drs. Daniel Brotman MD, FACP, SFHM, Sanjay Saint MD, MPH and Benjamin Mba MBBS, MRCP (UK), FHM, FACP This is Daniel Brotman, Director of the Hospitalist Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital and past Annual Meeting Director for SHM. I look forward to seeing you at this year’s SHM Meeting in Washington, DC, and hope to see you at our session, The Art and Science of Clinical Reasoning! During this session, Sanjay Saint, Chief of Medicine at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System and a Special Correspondent to the New England Journal of Medicine, will introduce the topic of clinical reasoning, reviewing the common sources of diagnostic error, and discussing ways to avoid these pitfalls. Then, I will present two cases (time permitting) to master clinician, Benjamin Mba, Associate Chair of Medicine for Faculty Development at Cook County Hospital. Case presentations will be on real patients. Dr. Mba will not…

Confrontation vs. Collaboration

by Drs. Kenneth R. Epstein MD, MBA, FACP, FHM and Kenneth J. Heinrich MD, FACEP "I can’t believe that he didn’t even get a CT scan before he called me." "Why does she have to hassle me about every admission? Just take the patient!" Familiar phrases, right? What hospitalist hasn’t, at some point, been exasperated by the lack of a complete diagnostic workup prior to an emergency physician calling about an admission? And what emergency physician has not hung up the phone after a frustrating conversation with a hospitalist who has not wanted to admit a patient that clearly needs to be hospitalized? Emergency physicians and hospitalists are both part of the same team caring for these patients who present to the emergency room and need to be admitted. They also probably interact with one another more often than any other group of physicians. Yet, despite this frequent contact, the…

AAFP Approves Hospital Medicine 2015 for 22.5 Prescribed CME Credits

by Dr. Patricia (Trish) Seymour MD There is no doubt that Hospital Medicine has become an attractive focus for physicians trained in Family Medicine. In fact, according to a recent study by the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) about 9% of graduating Family Medicine residents choose immediately to pursue careers in hospital medicine1. Additionally, membership data shows that 11.6% of SHM members are Hospitalist Trained in Family Medicine (HTFM) and 59% of all hospital medicine groups employ HTFM2. With these numbers in mind, we’re excited to share that the SHM annual meeting, Hospital Medicine 2015, has been awarded AAFP prescribed CME credit. This year, as a result of work on the part of two SHM committees (Hospitalists Trained in Family Medicine and the Annual Meeting Planning Committee), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) has approved Hospital Medicine 2015 for 22.5 prescribed credits. This is an…

Using Mobile Apps at the Point-Of-Care

by Dr. Amit Pahwa MD Hospital Medicine 2015 promises to be an extraordinary event. Anuj, Kai, Roger, and I hope to add to that with our workshop, Dr. Hi Tech Hospitalist: Improving Quality and Value of Care through Mobile Apps. Just like you, we have been thrust in the world of mobile devices and healthcare without much guidance. Our workshop will provide hands-on experience with such apps as QxCalculate, Periop14, ASCVD calculator, Medisafe, and Quitstart. We plan to show you how we use mobile technology to make providers more efficient and engage patients in their own care. We will highlight a few apps that have helped us, but we also want to make sure that we address any questions that you may have. There are lots of apps out there; which ones are you using? If you’ve heard of one that you’d like to know more about or would like…

Workshopping the Elusive ECG

By Dr. Moises Auron MD, FAAP, FACP, SFHM We were taught about it in medical school, then during residency, and we even have questions about it on the boards. Yet still, for a Pediatrician, the electrocardiogram (ECG) appears to be an elusive diagnostic test when it comes to a high degree of certainty on its normality. I usually get questions from my residents about ECG’s that appear to be normal and so, without necessarily intending to diminish my clinical authority/experience, they ask if we can “just to make sure” curbside the pediatric cardiologists to have them look at the ECG. It seems uncanny that we are not regarded as having expertise in a diagnostic test that is supposed to be part of our core competencies. But the devil is in the details. How often have we really spent time ensuring our skills are fresh and that we become acquainted with…