HM14 – Annual Meeting

Coach and Be Coached

by Patrick Kneeland, MD and Read Pierce, MD Pop quiz! What is the name of the first person to run a four minute mile? Think you’ve got the answer? Okay. That was just a warm-up. Here’s the bonus question: What is the name of the person who coached the first person to run a four minute mile? A little tougher, but Franz Stampfl had a lot to do with the feat. He was adept at utilizing his methods to coach numerous athletes, including Roger Bannister (the first to break the 4 minute mile), Olympic gold medalists, and successful boxers. You may not recognize Stampfl’s name because he remarkably shunned the Bannister limelight, preferring to slip away quietly and get back to London to train other athletes. The take-home point is this: behind every great athletic achievement is a great story of hard work, successes, failures, perseverance, and luck. Behind that…

Show Me the Data!

by Weijen Chang, MD, FAAP, SFHM Last August, I sat in a packed ballroom at PHM 2013 in New Orleans, enjoying a raucous yet edifying romp through the highlights of a year’s worth of literature at Top Articles in Pediatric Hospital Medicine.  Barrett Fromme and Ben Bauer wove together education and entertainment while tackling what often can be not much more than a dry list of journal abstracts. Less than a week later, I was honored and horrified to be asked if I would join Barrett in presenting the Top Articles talk at Hospital Medicine 2014. But after the initial shock and fear wore off, the business of planning and preparing a talk began to mitigate my fears of measuring up to Ben Bauer’s comedic timing (and dancing).  Speaking with Barrett, I was impressed by the relative lack of systematic efficiency utilized in refining their list of articles.  While a…

SHM is listening. What are your educational needs?

How does SHM develop educational offerings? By listening. It’s no question that hospitalists have unique educational needs. In the 16 years since the National Association of Inpatient Physicians first held an independent annual meeting, the organization (which became the Society of Hospital Medicine in 2003) has grown its capacity to identify and meet these unique and differentiated needs, creating numerous channels for feedback and gap analysis including post-meeting evaluations, committees of front-line leaders, and a collaborations with American Board of Internal Medicine and other national organizations. An on-the-ground special interest forum eventually grew into SHM’s Leadership Academy, annual meeting attendee evaluations spawned new live-streaming and recorded sessions, and a dedicated Annual Meeting committee sifted through the multitude of proposed workshops and topics to arrive at this year’s compelling Hospital Medicine 2014 schedule. While these methods are extremely effective and agile, today there is very little data mapping the full spectrum…

What You’re Doing Is Wrong and Potentially Wasteful

by Dr. Sam Stellpflug MD You're headed to Hospital Medicine 2014 in Las Vegas in ten days, and that means you are dedicated to making yourself a well rounded and state of the art Hospitalist.  As a provider that takes pride in staying up-to-date and knowledgeable, how do you feel about being told that some of what you’re doing is wrong and potentially wasteful and dangerous?  Does it make it any tougher to swallow if that information is coming from an ER doc?  That’s what’s going to be happening from 11:45-12:25 on Wednesday, March 26th, in Mandalay Bay E. I’m going to be drawing on my experience as both an Emergency Medicine Physician and a Medical Toxicologist to walk through a number of important issues in the realm of poisoned patients. Some of the topics I’ll touch on will simply reinforce your practices in working through the differential diagnosis of…

Can we have mentors we never meet?

The medical and literary world lost some of its soul last week with the passing of the physician writer Dr. Sherwin Nuland. With HM14 coming up, I planned for this blog post to write about the session I’m giving with Greg Maynard and Cheryl O’Malley on Mentoring Quality Improvement.  For those of us a number of years out of residency, quality improvement was likely not part of our training. In our session, we will discuss how being a mentor or mentee can help fill that knowledge deficit. That personal one-on-one mentoring can help in many other areas: fostering career growth, learning new skills, growing as a person and a physician. I never met Dr. Nuland, but reflecting on his passing made me think about mentoring in another light. Can we have mentors we never meet? I was fortunate to share an email conversation with Dr. Nuland a couple of years ago…