Information Technology

Do You Hate Online Modules? I Do, Too.

I hate online modules. Perhaps my reflex repulsion stems from my experience – ok, experiences – completing online traffic school courses. Those timers forcing you to stay on a page for a specific amount of time. The ridiculous quizzes that don’t actually teach you anything. Maybe you are a more cautious driver than I am, but if so, just think of the last time you had to complete a mandatory online module for your hospital. I doubt it gripped your attention. The future of education may increasingly be online, but I am unconvinced that mandatory online modules are a format that will change the world. This is why I have spent so much time working with innovative teams to develop interactive learning modules that do not feel like online modules. Vinny Arora and I recently described on this blog our Costs of Care Value Conversation series of videos designed to…

Is Patient-Centered Care Bad for Resident Education? #JHMChat Explores #meded & #ptexp

The term “patient-centered” has become a healthcare buzzword and was certainly popularized by the creation of the patient-centered medical home in ambulatory care. In the inpatient world, patient-centered rounds symbolizes this effort to improve patient experience and is the subject of a new study in this month’s Journal of Hospital Medicine, which we'll discuss on next Monday's #JHMChat at 9 p.m. EST on Twitter. In a randomized trial, Brad Monash and UCSF colleagues explored the impact of patient-centered rounds on patient experience. Patient-centered rounds was a bundle of 5 evidence-based practices: 1) pre-rounds huddle; 2) bedside rounds; 3) nurse integration; 4) real-time order entry; and 5) whiteboard updates. The control group continued with routine practice of attending rounds. The study was impressive for several reasons, but one in particular caught my attention – an army of 30 pre-med students volunteered to be observers (and also get shadowing experience?) to monitor…

Do Clinicians Understand Quality Metric Data?

The number and complexity of quality metrics within healthcare continues to expand, many of which are used to compare performance between hospitals, systems, and/or clinicians. To make these comparisons fair, many quality reporting agencies attempt to “risk stratify” these metrics, so as not to penalize those caring for higher complexity patients. Although laudable, these attempts also increase the complexity of the data and may reduce the ability of clinicians to understand and analyze quality performance. A recent article in the Journal of Hospital Medicine explores clinicians’ understanding of quality metrics using central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) as an example. The investigators used a unique Twitter-based survey to explore clinicians’ interpretation of basic concepts in public-reported CLABSI rates and ratios. I recently caught up with the lead author, Dr. Sushant Govindan, to better understand his team’s research and its implications for quality reporting. Dr. Govindan is a Pulmonary-Critical Care fellow…

3 Tips for Bringing Doctors and Data Specialists Together

By: Victoria Valencia, MPH, Assistant Director of Healthcare Value Christopher Moriates, MD, Assistant Dean of Healthcare Value Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin With tele-machines beeping, robots rolling by and so many different people rotating in and out of rooms, the hospital environment can be chaotic. Similarly, the data environment of many of our electronic health records (EHRs) can be quite unruly. EHR systems are not always designed for clinicians to input data in a way that can be researched and used in quality improvement. Just as hospitalists become comfortable working amongst the whir of the wards, data specialists learn how to handle the thicket of data libraries. Report writers and clinicians who request reports often have little to no experience with the workflow and context of the other. It’s no wonder why it often feels like we are speaking different languages and why the reports…

Wow! A Two-fer

First I hear the American Board of Pediatrics ordains hospital medicine as a bonafide subspecialty. Then, for the adults among us, CMS issues a hospitalist specialty code.  No joke.  A specialty code--go live on April 3, 2017. This has been a laborious task and years in the making. Have a lookie: If you are scratching your head and wondering about the fuss, let me tell you the insights we will draw from the new knowledge and why it will advance our specialty.  For years, hospitalists got lumped with "generalists" when CMS, researchers, or insurance companies ventured to look at physician utilization patterns and service to the healthcare system. What was our individual and collective cost or contribution to a case?  Who understood.  Any interested party trying to untangle what a doc was producing during a hospital stay had only billing patterns, i.e., the percentage of inpatient codes one charged, to determine if…
12345...10...