Leadership

If you were paying you, when would you time your bonus and how?

  We all walk into the supermarket and see an abundance of goods. Every item has a place under alluring lighting and come-hither ads. The displays move you and your wagon, despite your beliefs, through the aisles in a deliberate way. The Walmart Supercenter manager wishes to steer your senses so as to induce the transfer of maximal amounts of merchandise from the shelf to your basket (and money out of your wallet). You don't think Whole Foods places huge reams of flowers at the entrance to their stores just to remind you of Mother's Day, do you? (more…)

Lessons from the Wizard of Oz: Giving Thanks to Interprofessional Team Members

Tonight I happened to catch a few minutes of the Wizard of Oz- a great classic and our daughter was in delight watching the munchkins dance and sing for Dorothy. It also reminded me of the importance of a great team—Dorothy needed the Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and the Cowardly Lion to get to her final destination. Likewise, it takes a great team (and less singing and dancing ability fortunately) to take care of a patient in the hospital. We all know this, but if so, why is it sometimes so hard to work together in a team? Well, one reason is that doctors have not received formal training in how to interact with the multitude of team members that they will come into contact with while taking care of patients. That is now changing. The Association of American Medical Colleges now states that graduating medical students must be prepared…

Leadership Training for the Future, Now

by Ryan Gamlin
by Ryan Gamlin US Health care is in desperate need of leadership from within. And while there is certainly a notable and growing group of physician leaders (think of the Donald Berwicks, Eric Topols, and Bob Watchers of the world), doctors leading systemic change beyond the realm of clinical medicine is a relatively recent phenomenon. Health policy remains principally the domain of policy analysts, health and hospital administration is comprised largely of non-clinicians, and the design of our care delivery systems is often inefficient for patients and providers. Yet with an intimate understanding of the delivery of inpatient care (where the bulk of health care dollars are spent), training in the analysis and solution of complex problems, and a vested interest in the efficient provision and administration of care, there is no group better suited -- yet paradoxically under-equipped -- to drive many of these efforts than hospitalists. The underlying…
Ryan Gamlin is a second year medical student at the University of Cincinnati and alumnus of the University of Colorado Health Innovations Scholars Program. He believes that the challenges facing health are are best solved by those who deliver care. His research interests include efficiency of healthcare administration, composition of the healthcare workforce, and medical education. Before going back to medical school, Ryan was a healthcare management consultant.

Before The White Coat: Exploring the Early Lives of Hospitalists

When you see him onstage, it's like he's always been here. Bob Wachter, one of the pioneers of the hospital medicine movement, has taken the podium at SHM's annual meetings for more than a decade. Whether he's uncovering important issues in electronic medical records or covering Elton John songs onstage, he seems like a fixture in our world -- and in healthcare. The Unique Paths of Hospitalist Careers But, rather than being a fixed, static thing, the life of any hospitalist -- including the leaders of the movement -- is a progression. [caption id="attachment_12733" align="alignleft" width="169"] Available on iTunes: Before The White Coat[/caption] That progression starts in a different place for every hospitalist, influenced by the people and events of their lives. Some hospitalists knew that they wanted to be in medicine from a young age. Others found their calling much later in life. Every one of those progressions is interspersed with moments…

Hospitalist Reads Book, Changes Story, Lives Happily Ever After

by Dr. Rebecca Lauderdale I’ve had an obsession with stories lately. Specifically, the way stories we tell about ourselves and others can either limit us or spur us to grow and transform – as people and organizations. Truthfully, it’s much easier to talk about this with people who aren’t in healthcare professions. We in medicine, including myself, can be particularly reluctant to adopt “soft” techniques for improving our practices and systems of care. We want evidence-based, proven methods. I admit there was a time in the not-so-distant past when I would have balked at the idea of using stories to improve healthcare delivery. I have become increasingly convinced, however, that there is strong evidence that stories are foundational and that the type of stories we tell can make or break healthcare – from the individual practice of a provider to the function of a hospital or health system. [caption id="attachment_12650"…
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