MedEd

Purge this Word Your Vocabulary. It’s Likely Harming Patients and Wasting Real Money.

  A little something I sent to my residents--and I post it here as the issue has relevance to every clinician.  Also, a wise professor offered me something to contemplate.  As you read, consider whether this is a professionalism OR systems issue.  If the latter, are the behaviors in accord with the signals we give our trainees, nocturnists and shift workers. Further, do we then have a system designed to provide us with the results we are asking for?  Scenario One: You walk into a bar, and you see a hot girl or guy. You think, "Hmm, I want to meet this person. Let me consider what to do next." Scenario Two: You have a car with a sluggish engine. Something is not right. Once again, you think, "I need to consider how to get the motor purring again." In both cases, everyone would agree you have some decisions to…

Student Resolutions for the New Year

by Dr. Hyung (Harry) Cho
by Dr. Harry Cho As we ring in the New Year, the medical students in our new Student High Value Care Committee (sHVC) have three wishes. They spent quite a bit of time doing research, reviewing evidence and guidelines like Choosing Wisely and our own, Things We Do For No Reason. [caption id="attachment_14088" align="alignleft" width="300"] The Student High Value Care Pitch Day.[/caption] The amazing thing about students is that they haven’t yet conformed to our standards of medicine. They are learning more about what could be, and not what is. An air of innocence surrounds them, as they attend lectures, read textbooks and examine literature with the purest of intentions. If anything doesn’t make sense, they speak out with honesty. So in the spirit of #ThingsWeDoForNoReason, they showcased their honesty with these three wishes in front of our faculty, staff, and fellow classmates during our sHVC “Pitch Day” at Icahn…
Dr. Hyung (Harry) Cho is the Director of Quality and Patient Safety for the Division of Hospital Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. He is also the Chair of the High Value Care Committee where he develops innovations to decrease unnecessary medical testing and treatment. His primary research focus is in the relationship of overuse and patient harm, as well as in high value care education and implementation. Since 2011 he has been an academic hospitalist at Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital. He was selected as the Clinical Quality Fellow for the Greater New York Hospital Association and United Hospital Fund, and as the Senior Fellow for the Lown Institute. His efforts in value improvement have received many awards and recognition, including the Choosing Wisely Case Study Award from Society of Hospital Medicine. You can follow Dr. Cho on Twitter @HyungChoMD.

Leadership Training for the Future, Now

by Ryan Gamlin
by Ryan Gamlin US Health care is in desperate need of leadership from within. And while there is certainly a notable and growing group of physician leaders (think of the Donald Berwicks, Eric Topols, and Bob Watchers of the world), doctors leading systemic change beyond the realm of clinical medicine is a relatively recent phenomenon. Health policy remains principally the domain of policy analysts, health and hospital administration is comprised largely of non-clinicians, and the design of our care delivery systems is often inefficient for patients and providers. Yet with an intimate understanding of the delivery of inpatient care (where the bulk of health care dollars are spent), training in the analysis and solution of complex problems, and a vested interest in the efficient provision and administration of care, there is no group better suited -- yet paradoxically under-equipped -- to drive many of these efforts than hospitalists. The underlying…
Ryan Gamlin is a second year medical student at the University of Cincinnati and alumnus of the University of Colorado Health Innovations Scholars Program. He believes that the challenges facing health are are best solved by those who deliver care. His research interests include efficiency of healthcare administration, composition of the healthcare workforce, and medical education. Before going back to medical school, Ryan was a healthcare management consultant.

Final Reflections on My Summer at CHOP

by Mimi Zander
by Mimi Zander I feel accomplished. My summer in Philadelphia has been full of learning, team building, reflection, and of course alarm review. As I get ready to head into second year, all I can manage to do is make lists. This post is no exception. Without further ado, in no particular order, this summer I've accomplished the following: Wrote a protocol It's taken all summer, but I've written a protocol on the epidemiology of alarms in our hospital's PICU. It's surprising that after almost three years working in research, it's taken this long. I've read protocols, certainly. I've revised and meticulously followed them on many occasions, but I haven't drafted one from scratch, not until now at least. I will carry this project into my second year, participate in calls, make my way over to Philadelphia for meetings, and hopefully by winter break I will start drafting a manuscript…
Mimi Zander is a second year medical student at the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in Harlem, New York City. She is one of three medical students to receive SHM’s Student Hospitalist Scholar Grant with which she is completing scholarly work related to patient safety in the hospital. Mimi received her B.A. from Rutgers University in 2011 with a concentration in English, and she completed her post baccalaureate studies at the University of Pennsylvania.
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