Operations

The Return of #JHMChat and Choosing Wisely

by Charlie M. Wray DO, MS
By: Charlie M. Wray DO, MS I’ll be honest – I can’t remember who won the 2012 Super Bowl, World Series or any other pop culture phenomenon*, but I do recall stumbling across something called Choosing Wisely® one afternoon while sitting in my clinic. With a burgeoning awareness that much of the care I was providing seemed superfluous and wasteful, the discovery that there was a group of physicians who shared this same sentiment was exciting! Five years in, the Choosing Wisely® campaign has published more than 500 specialty recommendations – with the Society of Hospital Medicine working on the upcoming version 2.0 (all are welcome to contribute!). Just as Choosing Wisely is gearing up for round 2, the Journal of Hospital Medicine’s (JHM) online journal club, #JHMChat, is rebooting as well! After a brief summer hiatus, we’re happy to announce that #JHMChat will be returning to discuss “Against Medical…
Charlie M. Wray DO, MS is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center. He completed medical school at Western University – College of Osteopathic Medicine, residency at Loma Linda University Medical Center, and a Hospital Medicine Research Fellowship at The University of Chicago. Dr. Wray’s research interests are focused on inpatient care transitions, care fragmentation in the hospital setting, and overutilization of hospital resources. Additionally, he has strong interests in medical education, with specific focus in evidence-based medicine, the implementation of value-based care, and how learners negotiate medical uncertainty. Dr. Wray can often be found tweeting under @WrayCharles.

Navigating a Near Miss

When my daughter was around 5 years old, she disappeared. We were outside, my wife and I doing some work around the house, and our 5-year-old playing on the driveway. She was deeply engrossed in some colored chalk, creating an infinite hopscotch board. I stepped inside to grab something, and my wife went to grab something else on the side of the house. We both returned to the driveway to find chalk rolling down towards the sidewalk – and no daughter. She couldn’t have run into the house; that’s where I was. Nor the backyard, where my wife had been. We call her name, look around, and then realize she must have run off down the sidewalk. But we don’t see her. Images flash by. She runs into the street and gets struck by a car. She turns towards a backyard and vanishes in the next neighborhood. She hides behind…

Making the Implicit Explicit

Last month, I wrote about some interesting workplace trends, in particular about how the implied compact between U.S. workers and their employers is evolving rapidly. Few of us in the workforce today can conceive of an employment relationship in which we are guaranteed lifelong employment and a generous benefits package including full healthcare and retirement in exchange for hard work and loyalty to a single employer. Since then, I’ve had several conversations about the term “compact” as I used it in that post. At its most fundamental, a compact is an agreement between two or more parties. In my recent post, I used the term to refer to the generally accepted but rarely articulated set of expectations that workers and their employers have of each other. There is an implied compact between physicians and the hospitals where they practice as well. Historically that compact assumed that doctors would refer lots…

Cultivating Women Leaders in Healthcare #WIMmonth #ThisIsWhatADoctorLooksLike

On my way home from Scotland, I had a moment to watch a movie while my daughter was caught up in the encore adventures of Moana. I stumbled upon Hidden Figures, the story of the African American women at NASA who helped launch John Glenn into space, relaunching the nation’s space program. These women were true heroes and patriots – they lived in a man’s world and a white world, and they still managed to overcome and lead when needed. Yet, their story was “hidden” from the public until years later when popularized into this screenplay. On the plane, I realized I needed a fresh take to start my women in medicine webinar for this month’s American Medical Association Women in Medicine webinar. Instead of exploring the ‘leaky pipeline’ resulting in 1 in 5 professors who are female, I wondered whether were there hidden figures – women leaders among us…

What We Expect and What We Get from Work

Are American workers becoming happier with less? An interesting article in last Friday’s Wall Street Journal reported on the findings of a recent survey of U.S. workers by the Conference Board, a research organization. Although the survey wasn’t specific to healthcare, much less hospitalists, I see some parallels that might cause many of us to stop and think more carefully about what we expect from our work. The Conference Board’s findings highlight how American workers’ employment relationships are evolving and how that is impacting what Americans think of as a “good” job. The biggest shift has come in the nature of the implied compact between workers and their employers; unlike a generation or two ago, U.S. workers no longer expect to receive a generous benefits and lifelong employment in exchange for hard work and loyalty. In fact, I suspect many younger workers today would face the prospect of lifelong employment…
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