Operations

Does Your Onboarding Process Really Get Folks On Board?

Not long ago, I had a conversation with a good friend who is the hospitalist medical director for a five-hospital health system in the northeast. We were commiserating about how hard it is to recruit new hospitalists to rural and small-town settings and the high risk of rapid turnover despite all the energy invested in recruiting and onboarding them. As we discussed how new hospitalists are oriented into his organization, I learned that like most hospitalist groups, my friend’s group focuses onboarding efforts on making sure that new providers know how to find their way around the hospital and use the EHR, complete required training modules, are credentialed with payors, and are aware of applicable policies and procedures. They also see this time as a probationary period to ensure the new group member has adequate clinical skills and behavioral competencies. This conversation got me thinking about the crucial relationship between…

US Versus Foreign Trained Docs: Who Saves More Lives?

Yeah, I know the headline drew you in.  I sleuthed ya---but I have a reason. A study out in BMJ today, and its timing is uncanny given the immigration ban we are now experiencing. First, to declare my priors. I will take an IMG to work by my side any day of the week.  You need to be twice as smart, motivated, and industrious to make your way to American shores. The paper:   The researchers analyzed data on 1.2 million hospital admissions of Medicare patients aged 65 and over between 2011 and 2014 and for 44,227 internists. The average age of patients was 80, and the most common causes of death were sepsis, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The difference in results was slight, but I post the tables if only to show, at least based on this sample set, at worst, IMGs are equal to, and best,…

Do Clinicians Understand Quality Metric Data?

The number and complexity of quality metrics within healthcare continues to expand, many of which are used to compare performance between hospitals, systems, and/or clinicians. To make these comparisons fair, many quality reporting agencies attempt to “risk stratify” these metrics, so as not to penalize those caring for higher complexity patients. Although laudable, these attempts also increase the complexity of the data and may reduce the ability of clinicians to understand and analyze quality performance. A recent article in the Journal of Hospital Medicine explores clinicians’ understanding of quality metrics using central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) as an example. The investigators used a unique Twitter-based survey to explore clinicians’ interpretation of basic concepts in public-reported CLABSI rates and ratios. I recently caught up with the lead author, Dr. Sushant Govindan, to better understand his team’s research and its implications for quality reporting. Dr. Govindan is a Pulmonary-Critical Care fellow…

The Nursing Home Get Out of Jail Card (“We Don’t Want Our Patient Back”). It’s Now Adios.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has not updated its rules ("conditions for participation") for nursing homes in twenty-five years. Late last year they finally did. Many of the changes will have an impact on the daily lives of NH residents but are far removed from hospital medicine.  Think a resident's ability to pick their own roommate and have all hours visitors.  However, there are a few changes that intersect with HM, and a notable one will affect how you respond to a frequently encountered roadblock long-term care facilities sometimes throw our way. First, though, some of the changes CMS finalized.  With SHM members now moving into the post-acute and LTC realm, several have real relevance (I only cite a sliver of them): (more…)

Online Ratings For Hospital CEO, CFO’s, etc.

This week's NEJM features an article on hospital-sponsored online rating sites for docs.  The author, Vivian S. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., MBA, a prominent health services researcher discusses the adoption and success of her program at the University of Utah and how the system uses a portal open to patients to evaluate staff. In the piece, she covers familiar ground. Early renunciation and eventual acceptance by faculty in a manner you can predict: initial fears of reputation and prestige loss give way to a stable system allowing docs to obtain feedback in real time to improve their game.  It is not all wine and roses in her telling, but like all things, the apocalypse never materializes, and the once unthinkable becomes business as usual. Docs adjust.  Life moves on. Also in her viewpoint, she cites a recent study of interest that continues to get a lot of attention whenever inquiring minds consider provider ratings.…
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