Patient Experience

Hospitality and Art in Medicine: A Response to Sarah Candler, MD’s “Medical Map-Making”

by John David Ike
By: John David (JD) Ike As a medical student, much of my time and energy is spent studying the sciences. For the better part of my day, I pour through online resources, question banks and medical journals to learn the facts necessary to succeed on the wards and on the boards. Little to no time is spent discussing the broader implications of medicine on society, the tenets of medical professionalism, and the history of the medical profession. Most importantly, no time is spent discussing the arts – the tangible elements that display and celebrate our shared humanity and highlight our values, beliefs and traditions. As an appreciator of the arts with a research interest in the intersection of visual art and medicine, I found an opportunity to explore this topic as a teaching assistant for an Emory University undergraduate study abroad course in Italy titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts.”…
John David (JD) is a fourth-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, GA. Prior to attending medical school, JD earned his Bachelor of Arts in Art History at Davidson College in Davidson, NC. While at Davidson, JD explored many topics related to the art of medicine including the manifestation of the medical discourse in Thomas Eakins’ 19th century surgical paintings and the role government and urban design play in control of a populace’s well-being through an exploration of the 19th century “Haussmannization” of Paris, France. While at Emory, JD was able to continue his passion for the medical humanities as a teaching assistant for an undergraduate study abroad course titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts” and through other related endeavors. He plans to enter internal medicine upon graduation from Emory and hopes to continue to explore his research and teaching interest in the medical humanities. Please feel free to reach out to JD at [email protected]

The Next Step In Transparency With Our Patients

HPI: The patient is a 54yo very obese depressed man with history of drug abuse, non-compliance with meds, and possibly undiagnosed OSA readmitted today for pain control after claiming to have “run out” of his opiates after discharge from the hospital AMA 2 days ago following knee surgery. Have you ever written like this in your patient notes? Since the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) was passed in 1996 - and even long before that - patients have had the ability to request to see and read their medical records. In the era of defensive medicine, we have been asked to imagine the plaintiff’s lawyer sitting on our shoulder and reading whatever we write in the medical record. It hasn’t been stressed nearly as much to imagine our patients sitting on that other shoulder, and with good reason. In actuality, it was a pretty rare event for patients…

Can Eating Well Improve Patient and Provider Satisfaction?

I am conflicted when I travel. Do I savor the new city and adventure in small doses or try to see as much as I can? I favor the former but often find myself navigating like the latter. For instance, during a recent visit to NYC, we scurried from activity to activity, hungry pizza rats in the city. During our yearly visits, we seek out basic New York staples.  It was a day of bagels at a stand in Chelsea Market, NY pizza in an Uber as we hustled with the kids across town, a cart knish and pretzel outside Central Park, and a hot dog dinner standing up on my sister’s patio on the Upper West Side. As we lingered outside, my wife pointed out that we ate all our meals standing up, constantly on the move. We reached our food goals, without taking the time to enjoy and appreciate…

Slow Down and Ask

We all knew her time was limited; recurrent metastatic glioblastoma at the age of 26. Surrounded by her husband and parents at all times, rounding on her was becoming more difficult for the team to endure. Each day she had a new limitation. First it was her inability to swallow food, then liquids, then her own secretions. Then it was urinary incontinence. Now it was relentless orthostatic hypotension. This was the worst for her. All of the past issues she handled with grace and strength, but this orthostatic hypotension made her unable to sit up or raise her head. As I explained how this was unlikely to get any better, and that we would need to plan for this going forward, this was the first tear I saw creep out of the corner of her right eye. Her family was still hopeful that the compassionate-use 4th line treatment that we…

Recidivism

  You might wonder why “recidivism” in the subject line. In the context of readmissions, the word comes up often—and in particular, those who cycle from shelters to the street to the ER. Rinse. Repeat.  I focus on the Northeast, but my guess is your regional experience is like mine. You have noticed over the last two to three years, big cities, and NYC in particular, have seen a marked uptick in the number of people sleeping on the sidewalks. The causes of the increase stem from budget cuts, the economy and myriad other factors you can probably surmise. (more…)
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