Patient Satisfaction

Hospitality and Art in Medicine: A Response to Sarah Candler, MD’s “Medical Map-Making”

by John David Ike
By: John David (JD) Ike As a medical student, much of my time and energy is spent studying the sciences. For the better part of my day, I pour through online resources, question banks and medical journals to learn the facts necessary to succeed on the wards and on the boards. Little to no time is spent discussing the broader implications of medicine on society, the tenets of medical professionalism, and the history of the medical profession. Most importantly, no time is spent discussing the arts – the tangible elements that display and celebrate our shared humanity and highlight our values, beliefs and traditions. As an appreciator of the arts with a research interest in the intersection of visual art and medicine, I found an opportunity to explore this topic as a teaching assistant for an Emory University undergraduate study abroad course in Italy titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts.”…
John David (JD) is a fourth-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, GA. Prior to attending medical school, JD earned his Bachelor of Arts in Art History at Davidson College in Davidson, NC. While at Davidson, JD explored many topics related to the art of medicine including the manifestation of the medical discourse in Thomas Eakins’ 19th century surgical paintings and the role government and urban design play in control of a populace’s well-being through an exploration of the 19th century “Haussmannization” of Paris, France. While at Emory, JD was able to continue his passion for the medical humanities as a teaching assistant for an undergraduate study abroad course titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts” and through other related endeavors. He plans to enter internal medicine upon graduation from Emory and hopes to continue to explore his research and teaching interest in the medical humanities. Please feel free to reach out to JD at [email protected]

The Next Step In Transparency With Our Patients

HPI: The patient is a 54yo very obese depressed man with history of drug abuse, non-compliance with meds, and possibly undiagnosed OSA readmitted today for pain control after claiming to have “run out” of his opiates after discharge from the hospital AMA 2 days ago following knee surgery. Have you ever written like this in your patient notes? Since the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) was passed in 1996 - and even long before that - patients have had the ability to request to see and read their medical records. In the era of defensive medicine, we have been asked to imagine the plaintiff’s lawyer sitting on our shoulder and reading whatever we write in the medical record. It hasn’t been stressed nearly as much to imagine our patients sitting on that other shoulder, and with good reason. In actuality, it was a pretty rare event for patients…

Can Eating Well Improve Patient and Provider Satisfaction?

I am conflicted when I travel. Do I savor the new city and adventure in small doses or try to see as much as I can? I favor the former but often find myself navigating like the latter. For instance, during a recent visit to NYC, we scurried from activity to activity, hungry pizza rats in the city. During our yearly visits, we seek out basic New York staples.  It was a day of bagels at a stand in Chelsea Market, NY pizza in an Uber as we hustled with the kids across town, a cart knish and pretzel outside Central Park, and a hot dog dinner standing up on my sister’s patio on the Upper West Side. As we lingered outside, my wife pointed out that we ate all our meals standing up, constantly on the move. We reached our food goals, without taking the time to enjoy and appreciate…

5-Star Ratings Don’t Mean 5-Star Care

Despite aggressive criticism, CMS is proceeding to release its star ratings for hospitals this month. Hospital advocates have been among the most vocal opponents, citing two primary concerns: The ratings vastly oversimplify a complex set of metrics. There are no concessions for social determinants of illness. Ashish Jha, MD, a professor at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, has advocated against the ratings, predominantly for the two reasons stated above. Rick Pollack, president and CEO of the American Hospital Association, expressed similar reservations: “As currently designed, CMS’ star hospital ratings program is not up to the task of providing the public with meaningful and accurate assessments of hospital performance. Patients need reliable information to make important choices regarding their healthcare. And hospitals and health systems need reliable information so that they can continue to improve the quality of the care delivered. CMS star ratings misses the mark on both…

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

A lot has been written about physician (or provider) burnout. Some of the highest burnout rates include internists and ER doctors, both of which live in our wheelhouse, and some factors that impact the burnout rate have included too many bureaucratic tasks, insufficient income, the computerization of medicine, the ACA, (thanks Obama), insufficient income in relation to hours of work, lack of work-life balance, hyper-responsible personality types as well as a lack of individual control within an organization. But in my practice, one of the greatest negative impacts I see on provider attitude and compassion fatigue is the erosion of the respectful relationship between provider and patient. Let me demonstrate. Just last week on our hospital medicine service, we had a patient call a provider "bitch," had a patient who refused to take any medicine or comply with any phlebotomy without multiple 45-minute debates about the relative merits of each…
...23456...