Quality Improvement (QI)

The Return of #JHMChat and Choosing Wisely

by Charlie M. Wray DO, MS
By: Charlie M. Wray DO, MS I’ll be honest – I can’t remember who won the 2012 Super Bowl, World Series or any other pop culture phenomenon*, but I do recall stumbling across something called Choosing Wisely® one afternoon while sitting in my clinic. With a burgeoning awareness that much of the care I was providing seemed superfluous and wasteful, the discovery that there was a group of physicians who shared this same sentiment was exciting! Five years in, the Choosing Wisely® campaign has published more than 500 specialty recommendations – with the Society of Hospital Medicine working on the upcoming version 2.0 (all are welcome to contribute!). Just as Choosing Wisely is gearing up for round 2, the Journal of Hospital Medicine’s (JHM) online journal club, #JHMChat, is rebooting as well! After a brief summer hiatus, we’re happy to announce that #JHMChat will be returning to discuss “Against Medical…
Charlie M. Wray DO, MS is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center. He completed medical school at Western University – College of Osteopathic Medicine, residency at Loma Linda University Medical Center, and a Hospital Medicine Research Fellowship at The University of Chicago. Dr. Wray’s research interests are focused on inpatient care transitions, care fragmentation in the hospital setting, and overutilization of hospital resources. Additionally, he has strong interests in medical education, with specific focus in evidence-based medicine, the implementation of value-based care, and how learners negotiate medical uncertainty. Dr. Wray can often be found tweeting under @WrayCharles.

Is It Time for Health Policy M&Ms?

[caption id="attachment_16917" align="alignnone" width="609"] https://twitter.com/ChrisMoriates/status/890259986873450508[/caption] There are few experiences in my medical training that felt more intimidating, and ultimately more impactful, than our Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) conferences. The patients whose diagnoses I missed. The times I should have called my attending or pushed harder for the cardiologist to come in overnight. They stick with me and I believe ultimately have helped make me a better doctor. This is why I was intrigued by the idea of explicitly incorporating health policy issues into M&M. Over the past few years, I increasingly have seen adverse events that result from issues related to health policy. Inability to access care for appropriate hospital follow-up. Failure to fill a critical prescription due to cost or gaps in coverage. A patient I admitted for “expedited work-up” for rectal bleeding after he told me he had been trying to get a recommended colonoscopy for many months…

You Have Lowered Length of Stay. Congratulations. You’re Fired.

For several decades, providers working within hospitals have had incentives to reduce stay durations and keep patient flow tip-top. DRG-based and capitated payments expedited that shift. Accompanying the change, physicians became more aware of the potential repercussions of sicker and quicker discharges. They began to monitor their care and as best as possible, use what measures they could ascertain as a proxy for quality (readmissions and hospital acquired conditions). Providers balanced the harms of a continued stay over the benefits of added days, not to mention the need for cost savings. However, the narrow focus on the hospital stay, the first three to seven days of illness, distracted us from the out weeks after discharge. With the acceleration of inpatient episodes, we cast patients to post-acute settings unprepared for the hardship they would face. By the latter, I mean, frailty risk, more reliance on others for help, and a greater need…

A New Face For Online Modules

It is hard for me to get excited by online modules. Perhaps my reflex repulsion stems from my experience – ok, experiences – completing online traffic school courses. Those timers forcing you to stay on a page for a specific amount of time. The quizzes that might not actually teach you anything. Maybe you are a more cautious driver than I am, but if so, just think of the last time you had to complete a mandatory online module for your hospital. I doubt it gripped your attention. The future of education may increasingly be online, but I am unconvinced that mandatory online modules are a format that will change the world. This is why I have spent so much time working with innovative teams to develop interactive learning modules that do not feel like online modules. Vinny Arora and I recently described on this blog our Costs of Care…

The Essentials of QI Leadership: A Conversation with Dr. Eric Howell, Part 2

My last blog post, featuring my Q and A with Dr. Eric Howell, Division Director, Collaborative Inpatient Medicine Service (CIMS) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center in Baltimore, MD, and SHM's Senior Physician Advisor, focused on his early days in Quality Improvement (QI) and advice for training in QI. This next post discusses the Center’s role within SHM and how hospitalists can become involved in quality improvement. How did you get involved in The Center, and can you explain your role in The Center today? It was a lot of luck, good timing and being prepared. I’ve been in The Center for two years. Before that, I was involved with a number of The Center’s successful QI projects. I was reasonably well known in the Project BOOST (SHM's program for improving care transitions) community. Along with Mark Williams and Jeff Greenwald, I was one of the original three who pitched Project…
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