Chris Moriates

About Chris Moriates

Christopher Moriates, MD is a hospitalist, the assistant Dean for Healthcare Value and an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at Dell Medical School at University of Texas, Austin. He is also Director of Implementation Initiatives at Costs of Care. He co-authored the book Understanding Value-Based Healthcare (McGraw-Hill, 2015), which Atul Gawande has called “a masterful primer for all clinicians,” and Bob Wachter said is “essential reading for everyone who care about making our system better.”
By  | August 1, 2018 |  4
I have a theory. There is a simple thing hospitalists can do that can enhance relationships with our patients, and even, I bet, improve patient satisfaction scores. The catch is it is not something you can do for yourself; you can only “pay it forward” for somebody else. We know patients who trust their physicians […]
By  | June 13, 2018 |  0
In 2011-2012, an undergrad pre-med student performed an ingeniously simple but enlightening health policy study. Jamie Rosenthal called 122 hospitals across the U.S. (2 randomly selected hospitals from each state, plus Washington D.C., along with the 20 top-ranked orthopedic hospitals according to the US News and World Report rankings that year) and asked them what […]
By  | April 23, 2018 |  0
“You can teach a canary in a coal mine to meditate, but it is still going to die.” I have seen this canary sentiment as a metaphor for health care and burnout pop up a few times on Twitter recently, attributed to a couple different thoughtful doctors, including Dr. Jenny Ramsey (at Hospital Medicine 2018), […]
By  | February 28, 2018 |  0
“We are playing the same sport, but a different game,” the wise, thoughtful emergency medicine attending physician once told me. “I am playing speed chess – I need to make a move quickly, or I lose – no matter what. My moves have to be right, but they don’t always necessarily need to be the […]
By  | August 16, 2017 |  0
There are few experiences in my medical training that felt more intimidating, and ultimately more impactful, than our Mortality and Morbidity (M&M) conferences. The patients whose diagnoses I missed. The times I should have called my attending or pushed harder for the cardiologist to come in overnight. They stick with me and I believe ultimately […]
By  | July 21, 2017 |  0
It is hard for me to get excited by online modules. Perhaps my reflex repulsion stems from my experience – ok, experiences – completing online traffic school courses. Those timers forcing you to stay on a page for a specific amount of time. The quizzes that might not actually teach you anything. Maybe you are […]