Perioperative Care: Top of Mind & Topic for #Periop #JHMChat on April 4th

By  |  March 28, 2016 | 

With great successes in hosting our first couple of Twitter chats over the last six months, we’re excited to bring you the third in our quarterly series, #JHMChat, where you ask Journal of Hospital Medicine (JHM) authors about their research and corresponding clinical implications for managing inpatient care. We invite you to join us for the next #JHMChat on Monday, April 4th at 9pm EDT, when we will discuss Dr. Kurt Pfeifer et al.’s article from JHM,Updates in perioperative medicine, which you can read here.

Perioperative care is a critical skillset for today’s hospitalists. The article authored by Dr. Pfeifer and colleagues highlights key clinical pearls from recent research on best practices in perioperative medicine. As the patient population ages and cases become more medically complex, hospitalists are key providers in ensuring safe, quality care for patients before, during and after surgery.

In keeping with our theme of promoting high value care in hospital medicine, we will cover specific controversies such as the latest thinking on the following conundrums:

  • Perioperative beta blockade
  • Use of aspirin perioperatively
  • Bridging anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation

Please join us and Dr. Kurt Pfeifer to discuss high value linical practices in perioperative medicine. Getting ready for the #JHMChat is easy. Here’s how:

  1. 1. Read the article.
  2. 2. Share this blog post and invite colleagues and trainees who would be interested in perioperative and/or hospital medicine to join the Twitter chat.
  3. 3. If you haven’t done so already, follow us all on Twitter: @JHospMedicine, @SHMLive, @futuredocs, @KurtPfeifer, @CostsofCare, @ABIMFoundation
  4. 4. Jump on Twitter on Monday, April 4th at 9pm EDT, following the hashtag for the Twitter chat, #JHMChat, posing and answering questions with Dr. Pfeifer and JHM.

 

See you on Twitter!

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About the Author: Vineet Arora

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Vineet Arora, MD, MAPP, MHM is Associate Chief Medical Officer, Clinical Learning Environment at University of Chicago Medicine and Assistant Dean for Scholarship and Discovery at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Dr. Arora’s scholarly work has focused on resident duty hours, patient handoffs, sleep, and quality and safety of hospital care. She is the recipient of the SHM Excellence in Hospital Medicine Research Award in 2007. Her work has appeared in numerous journals, including JAMA and the Annals of Internal Medicine, and has received coverage from the New York Times, CNN, and US News & World Report. She was selected as ACP Hospitalist Magazine’s Top Hospitalist in 2009 and by HealthLeaders Magazine as one of 20 who make healthcare better in 2011. She has testified to the Institute of Medicine on resident duty hours and to Congress about increasing medical student debt and the primary care crisis. As an academic hospitalist, she supervises medical residents and students caring for hospitalized patients. Dr. Arora is an avid social media user, and serves as Deputy Social Media Editor to the Journal of Hospital Medicine, helping to maintain its Twitter feed and Facebook presence. She blogs about her experiences at http://www.FutureDocsblog.com and actively tweets at @futuredocs.

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